Race and mental health

1. About this Toolkit

This toolkit has been created to support young people, parents and carers, and places of education with mental health issues that occur in relation to race. Resources include a range of advice on how to deal with these situations and signposts services that can help. We hope these resources can support you to live healthily while facing these issues and prevent a problem from escalating. The aim of this page is to equip you with the tools to help build that resilience.

Return to mental health in schools toolkit page for children and young people

2. Dealing with Racism

These resources explore how racism and mental health are linked and how it can impact the everyday life of young people. It provides advice on how to protect your mental health and insight into other young people who are dealing with similar issues.

  1. How Racism and Mental Health are Linked  – Young Minds article on how racism and your mental health are linked. This provides information on how to get help if you are experiencing racism, how to improve your wellbeing, where to report racist abuse or hate crimes and links to other helpful pages.
  2. Racism and How to Protect Your Mental Health  – BBC Bitesize article on racism and how to protect your mental health. It provides information for young people about what you can do if you are affected by racism and where to go for further support.
  3. How to Overcome Bullying – This article is by Alex Holmes who is an anti-bullying campaigner. He provides his own experiences of how he overcame bullying and also gives advice on what you can do if it is happening to you or someone you know. He also talks about what you can do if you do not think your school is doing enough to tackle racist bullying at school.
  4. Childline: Racism and Radical Bullying – This childline page provides advice to young poeople on what how to deal with racism and radical bullying, and what to do if they are being targeted due to coronavirus.
  5. The School that Tried to End Racism  – This is a documentary on channel 4 about the fist UK trial of a US programme aimed at educating children on unconscious bias and racism. The students in the two episodes are tested for unconscious racial bias and some students give their thoughts on the results.
  6. Racism and Mental Health for Young People — Christine Moran – Positive Energy Being (e-being.co.uk) – This e-being article includes information on how to improve your mental health, where you can report hate crimes, and where to get help and support. They also signpost to where you can get further help and support.
  7. Mental Health and Racism – Own It – BBC  – This aricle by the BBC gives young people tips and support for those feeling the effects of racism on their mental health. It advises the first step as ecognising how you feel and gives advice on what to do next.
  8. 10 Tips for Dealing With the Psychological Implications of Racism | Ditch the Label – “This article by DitchTheLabel 10 Tips for Dealing With the Psychological Implications of Racism. It talks about how affirmations can help your daily life, knowing your values, self care and embracing racial identity.”

3. Racism and Mental Health

  1. Different Types of Racism and How it Can Affect Your Mental Health – E-wellbeing is a digital wellbeing service for young people. This is a free module which teaches children and young people about different types of racism eg. microagressions, racial bias, and systematic racism. It advises on what actions you can take to improve your mental health.
  2. Working Together to Ensure Young People From Racialised Communities Can Access Appropriate Mental Health Support – UK Youth is a leading charity for young people. This article provides information on a new project to support young people from radicalised communities. This will be led by young people aged 16-25 with lived experience of mental health issues and racial injustices.
  3. Mental Health in South Asian Communities – This article discusses ‘the culture of shame’ in asian communities and what can be done to remove this stigma and get people the mental health support they need no matter what.
  4. Bereavement Resource – This resource from Thrive Ldn can support you if you are going through a sudden bereavement or the death of someone close to you. They have listed a range of services that are available for further support and there are specific sections for children and young people, LGBTQI+ communities, and support for BAME communities.

4. Shining a Light on Racism

  1. Impact of Everyday Racism on Mental Health of Young People – The department of experimental psychology describe what the impact is of ‘everyday’ racism on the mental health of young people. Fiyory Ghezae, an intern with the Emerging Minds Network provides an insight into the effects of racial discrimination on mental health of young people, the lack of representation currently in the UK and indirect racism.
  2. Racism and Young People’s Experiences – This BBC Newsround webpage gives children and young people information on what racism is, where it comes from and what you can do if you suffer from racism or want to help someone who is dealing with racism. There are also videos from other young people who talk about their experiences.
  3. The Power Of Martin Luther King Jr.’s Anger – This Podcast is about how Martin Luther King turned anger into a positive action – and how we can also do so. It also explains key moments in his life which led him to achieve the change he wanted.
  4. Evaluation of ‘Up My Street’ Programme – This is a report from the Centre for Mental Health (2018) called ‘Against the odds’ which is an evaluation of the Mind Birmingham ‘Up My Street’ programme. The programme consisted of community projects that were commissioned by Mind to improve the resilience of African Caribbean men in the city. This report explains why we should be focusing on these young men’s wellbeing and resilience, what undermined their mental health, what protects children and young people from the build-up of poor risk and mental health, and the findings from the evaluations of the projects. It also has feedback from the young men who were involved, and the overall impact of these projects.
  5. Mental Health in BAME Communities – This article from the Mental Health Foundation explains how mental health in BAME communities can be higher that for white people. It discusses what can affect this statistic, such as stigma, inequalities, and barriers to support. It also lists networks for specific communities to find support.

5. Self Care

These resources focus on self-care for BME communities. It advises on how to use social media in a healthy manner, how to promote good sleep in times of crisis and also how to look after yourself at university.

  1. Self Care in a Time of Crisis – The Centre for Mental Health provides information on black mental health and self-care in a time of crisis. Karda Abdinasir writes about embracing black culture, managing the use/viewing of social media in a balanced way, creating boundaries and focusing on sleep. There is also advice for who to contact if you need further support.
  2. Find Help Looking After Yourself – Young Minds is a national charity that works to improve the health and wellbeing of young people. This webpage provides support for looking after yourself at university, social media, gender, sexuality and mental health and general advice on dealing with the (Covid-19) pandemic.
  3. Mental Health and Self-care for Young People – This every mind matters article talks about mental health and self-care for young people. It gives advice on many things everyone can do to look after your mental health and why self care is so important at these times.
  4. Self-care Tips in the Name of Racial Injustice – This is a video of Chantal from Off the Record who talks about ways in which you can practice self care in the name of racial injustice and why it is so important. These tips are especially helpful when feeling burnt out and in need of some time to recharge.
  5. A Self-care Guide for Those Impacted by Racism – The Mix have created a self-care guide for those impacted by racism. It advises on healthy emotional responses and coping with experiences. It also signposts to further support available.
  6. Viktor Kunda’s 4-step guide to self care – Viktor Kunda, who is well known on TikTok and Instagram shares his 4-step guide to self-care through a funny video for young people.

6. Self Love

These resources advise on how to celebrate where you come from, and how to deal with negative thoughts you might have about yourself. There is also a link to testimony’s from other young people on how they learned to love themselves.

  1. Know Your Roots Project – Know Your Roots is a project which develops art that celebrates the beauty of black hair with young people from London Schools and youth centres aged 11-25. This resource pack includes information about black hair (history and heritage), hair care recipes and how to create art for social change.
  2. Learning to Love Dark Skin – Article by The Mix Ambassador Kiki (support service for children and young people up to the age of 25) on questioning racist beauty ideals, learning that dark is beautiful and how to deal with negative thoughts.
  3. Eight Simple Ways to Practice Self Love – The Mental Health Foundation provide 8 simple ways to practise self-love. It centres around sleep, social media and talking about problems with others.
  4. Understanding Self-Esteem – This Mind article explains what self esteeem is, how it can effect you, what can cause it and has a video from adults speaking on their experiences.
  5. A Guide to Self-Esteem – The Children’s Society provide resources for young people to raise their self esteem. It explains what this means, how it can be influenced by others, and what you can do to improve your self worth.
  6. 10 Tips for Dealing with the Psychological Implications of Racism – This article by DitchTheLabel 10 Tips for Dealing With the Psychological Implications of Racism. It talks about how affirmations can help your daily life, knowing your values, self care and embracing racial identity.

7. Talking about Racism

These resources support young people in speaking to their parents about racism and the BLM movement to open dialogue about current issues BME communities are facing and what they can do to help.

  1. How to Deal with Anti-blackness in South Asian Communties – An article by Simran (marketing and outreach officer) for The Mix, about anti-blackness that may still exist in some parts of the south Asian community and how to talk to and educate first generation about racism.
  2. Advice on Conversations About Race – Place2Be is a children’s mental health charity and in this article, they provide advice on conversations about race. This webpage talks about Black Lives Matter movement, how it has shone a light on inequalities and injustices happening in the world and how to have conversations about race with family, friends, and colleagues.
  3. Talking About Race and Why it Matters – The Smithsonian is one of the world’s largest research centers in science, the arts, and the humanities. This page advises on how to talk about race, why it matters, history and self care.

8. How to be an Ally

These resources support young people in learning about how to be ally’s to the BME community.

  1. How to be an Ally to the BLM Movement – Rachel Elder, ambassador for The Mix (support service for young people) explains what it is to be an ally to the BLM movement. Rachel talks about societal racism, why it is a white person’s problem too, how to educate yourself and ways to support the movement such as attending protests, supporting black creators and businesses, and speaking up.
  2. How to Stand Up as an Ally – Infographic from BameED Network and Dr Muna Abdi on how you can show up and stand up as an ally .
  3. White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack – This is an essay is by Peggy McIntosh (Associate director of the Wellesley Collage Center for Research on Women) in which she discusses what white privilege means, accountability and the effects of white privilege.
  4. Resources for White People to Learn and Talk About Racism – Article by Nina Berman on understanding the ways racism structures the world and provides a reading list with various resources including videos, books, articles etc. to educate people.
  5. Jenna Arnold’s Resources – Jenna Arnold is the author of Raising Our Hands, a book on how white people can have conversations about race. On this page, Jenna has provided a list of social media accounts that you can follow to help you continue to educate yourself.
  6. What White People can do for Racial Injustice – This article by Medium advises on 103 Things White People Can Do for Racial Justice.
  7. Focus Group on Locating Whiteness – This YouTube Video entails Simon Clarke (Coordinator of whiteness and race equality network) talking to a group of people from various backgrounds and professions on the themes of locating whiteness, why some people may not relate to whiteness, exploring how whiteness is important to the Black Lives Matter movement and how to incorporate Black Lives Matter message into mental health work. There is also a discussion on global racism.
  8. Privilege/Class/Social Inequalities Explained in a $100 Race – This YouTube video explains the concept of a head start and how some people may be more privileged than others. The student race is used as a metaphor for how others more privileged can help those less so and to acknowledge privilege.
  9. Guide to Allyship – This guide explains to young people how to be an effective ally and why it is important, how to handle mistakes and general do’s and don’ts.

9. Race, Sexuality and Mental Health

These resources provide support to young black people who are LGBTQ+ and struggle with their mental health.

  1. Black LGBTQ+ Struggle with Mental Health – Just Like Us is a LGBT+ charity for young people and they support schools to run LGBT+ and ally groups and organise a national campaign called School Diversity Week. This article provides information on how Black LGBT+ young people are more likely to struggle with their mental health compared to white LGBT+ young people. They are also more likely to experience depression and anxiety, and difficulties at home during lockdown. The article provides information on how Just Like Us can support schools through their school diversity week and provide them with a range of resources.
  2. How to be an Ally to Black People who are LGBTQ+ – Stonewall provides advice on 10 ways young people can be an ally to black LGBT people. This includes things like educating yourself, recognising and using your privilege to help, speaking up, using the right language and more.

10. Books for Older Children

  1. Malorie Blackman Noughts and Crosses – This book is about two young people are together in an alternate society that does not accept them. It discusses Noughts and Crosses Book Summary. Themes include racism and the impact it has on people’s wellbeing.
  2. Maya Angelou I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings – Maya Angelou was an american poet and civil rights activist. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is a autobiography describing her early life, her stance on feminism and dealing with race.
  3. Lisa Hathfield I am not a number  – This book is a dystopian story for young people based on a retelling of the Holocaust. It is set in the present day and themes include political tension, rise of fascism and prejudice in society. It is about hope and celebration of young people standing up for what they believe in.

11. Documentaries and Films on Racism for Young People

Here are a list of Documentaries for young people around racism and mental health. It teaches you how you can support yourself and others when dealing with these issues.

  1. The School that Tried to End racism – This is a documentary on channel 4 about the fist UK trial of a US programme aimed at educating children on unconscious bias and racism. The students in the two episodes are tested for unconscious racial bias and some students give their thoughts on the results.
  2. Educating Children on Unconscious Bias and Racism – This is a documentary on channel 4 about the fist UK trial of a US programme aimed at educating children on unconscious bias and racism. The students in the two episodes are tested for unconscious racial bias and some students give their thoughts on the results.
  3. Netflix Documentary – When They See Us – This documentary is based on a real-life story in 1989, the ‘central park jogger’ case and it explores the life of 5 suspects (teenagers) who were falsely accused and prosecuted and how it affected their lives and that of their families.
  4. Netflix Documentary – 13th – In this documentary on Netflix, scholars, activists, and politicians talks about the criminalisation of African Americans and the rise in people from BME communities as well as the prison system.
  5. TED Talk: Studying Privellege Systems to Strengthen Compassion – This Ted Talk by Peggy Mackintosh discusses systems of privilege, how it affects society and how ‘privilege’ should operate in society as a catalyst to compassionate action.
  6. Ted Talk: Let’s get to the Root of Racial Injustice – Megan Ming Francis, who is a professor at the university of Washington talks about root causes of the current racial climate.
  7. Ted Talk: How to Overcome Our Biases? Walk Boldly Towards Them – This Ted Talk is by Verna Myers who is a diversity advocate. She looks closely at some of the subconscious attitudes we hold toward groups and how we can change this. Transcript is available in 26 languages.
  8. Ted Talk: Priming Some Kids for College and Others for Prison – This Ted Talk by Alice is about the current situation for young children in America. It details her first hand experience in Philadelphia where she saw teenagers from african-american and latino backgrounds were not given enough support in the education system and ended up in the prison system.
  9. The Hate U Give (Movie) – This film is about Starr who lives in a mostly black neighbourhood but attends a white prep school. She witnesses her best friend be shot by police and must stand up for herself and use her voice to make injustice known. Very informative about how stereotypes fuel racism and police brutality.
  10. The Help – This film is from the perspective of black maids in 1960s and their experiences with raising white children. It centres around themes of social justice.
  11. The Pursuit of Happiness – This film is about a father who works in San Francisco and tries to achieve success and provide a better life for his son.
  12. Becoming (Michelle Obama) – This documentary follows Michelle Obama’s life, her upbringing, her education, her work in community outreach, and how she achieved what she has in life.

12. Resources for Those Aged 12 and Under

  1. Sesame Street Explanation on BLM – This video by Sesame Street has Elmo’s parents explaining to him what the black lives matter movement is, why people are protesting, and inequalities that exist.
  2. Ruby’s Worry and How to Overcome These Feelings – This is a play put on by a primary school based on a book about a child called Ruby who discovers she has a ‘worry’. Soon she realises that everyone has worries and it’s nothing to be embarrassed about. It provides a message to children about how to overcome their worries.
  3. The Princess and the Frog (PG) – This film follows Princess Tiana on her journey in opening a new restaurant. As Disney’s first black princess, Tiana provides representation for many young children to look toward.
  4. The Mega Magic Hair Swap – Rochelle Humes – This book is about two girls who want to change their natural hair and realise they are perfect the way they are.
  5. Brave Ballerina – Janet Collins – This is about a young girl who wants to be a ballerina in the 1930s – 40s when racial segregation existed. This story shows how Janet learned to be a ballerina and followed her dreams regardless of how difficult it was and shows her bravery.
  6. My monster and me – Nadia Hussain – This book is about children feeling confident to express what they are feeling. It explains why feelings matter and why we must speak up.

13. Advice and Resources for Parents and Carers

These resources are for parents and carers in relation to supporting children who are suffering from mental health issue due to racism. There are also links to training and toolkits for further learning on these topics.

  1. Reform of Mental Health Laws – This is a press release posted by the Department of Health and Social Care on how there will be landmark reform of mental health laws which will empower individuals to have more control over their treatment. It also has information on the plan to tackle mental health inequalities including disproportionate detention of people from BAME communities.
  2. Proposals for the Mental Health Act – Twitter Post from the Department of Health and Social Care about proposals to the mental health act. In this video Dr Jaqueline Dyer explains how these proposed changes will tackle disparities faced by people from Black and minority ethnic backgrounds in access, experience, and outcomes of mental healthcare.
  3. E-learning Platform – MindED is an e-learning platform for anyone who works with children and young people. It is free and applicable across health, social care, education, criminal justice, and community settings. This site has information for parents and carers from trusted experts on how to support your family and take care of yourself. You can find specific resources linked to what you search on the website, which is easy to navigate.
  4. Support your Child’s Mental Health and Wellbeing – BBC Bitesize toolkit for parents on how to support your child’s mental health and wellbeing. There are tips from experts, advice on how to tackle anxiety and fun activities for children and teenagers.
  5. Conversations with Children About Race – Insightful article on how conversations with children about race, actually helps to improve their mental health.
  6. Guide on How to Talk to Children About BLM – Happiful has created a guide to help all parents talk to their children about Black Lives Matter. It includes tips and advice on how to teach children about racial inequality, white privilege, and how to combat racism today.
  7. Supporting your Child with Racial Bullying – The NSPCC provides on advice on how you can support your child in dealing with racial bullying. This talks about how racism affects children, the different types of racism and discrimination, how to help children during this difficult period and next steps.
  8. Returning to School after Lockdown – Mind provides advice on returning to school for parents. In this video, Stacey Edmead-Payne who is a family practitioner shares 5 top tips in preparing children for school after lockdown.
  9. Talking to Children About Race and Discrimination – This Place2Be article provides advice for adults on how to talk to children about racism and discrimination. There are a list of resources that can help.
  10. Anti-Racism Resources for Parents – This document is a list of anti-racism resources for white people and parents to deepen your anti-racism work. It inlcudes a list of books/articles to read, podcasts and films to watch and listen to and a list of organisations to follow to help your learning.
  11. A Parent’s Guide to Black Lives Matter – Holmewood Nursery School have created a fantastic guide for parent’s on the Black Lives Matter movement. There are resources, activity ideas, and tips for families to work toward racial equality.
  12. 100 Race-Conscious Things You Can Say To Your Child To Advance Racial Justice – This blog post suggests language and sentence starters for speaking with children about advancing racial justice. Topics include proactive language, activism, multi-racial families and more.
  13. Think Like a White Man – Nels Abbey – This is a satirical book with an important message. It is about the nature of discrimination especially in the workplace and how to deal with it. It is an insight into race in general and more specifically the black experience.
  14. Born a Crime – Trevor Noah – In this memoir, comedian Trevor Noah, tells people his story on his childhood about how he was born in apartheid south Africa and his journey to his current life in America and the relationship he has with his mother.
  15. It’s Not About the Burqa – Mariam Khan – This book consists of 17 Muslim women talking about the hijab and faith, feminism, sex, racism, love and divorce and more. These essays give people a real insight into the thoughts of Muslim women, not just what is portrayed in the media .
  16. Brit-ish – Afuah Hursh – This book is about what it means to be ‘British’ and why BME communities still get asked questions like ‘where are you from? It discusses Britain’s past and explores how this came to be.

14. Advice and Resources for Educational Settings

These resources are for places of education and include initiatives to incorporate into schools and colleges. There are also many resources on training opportunities and actions that can be taken to ensure support is there for children and young people struggling with racism.

  1. Anti-Racism Charter – The National Educational Union has an anti- racism charter which is a framework to developing an anti-racist approach. It has been designed to help you explore ideas around race equality and plan how to tackle racism with children, young people, and staff. It explains what race and ethnicity means, why some organisations use the term ‘BME or BAME’, language that is used, and a power and voice checklist to determine priorities for schools and colleges.
  2. Show Racism the Red Card – SRtRC (Show Racism the Red Card) is an anti-racism charity to harness the high-profile nature of footballers and their platforms as anti-racist models to educate against racism. This article by Kristina Hedges (Education Worker) is informing educational settings about events they hold such as ‘wear red day’ and workshops they hold in schools, using a range of activities, to discuss racism with children and young people. They also offer training sessions to school staff on recognising and responding to racism and recording and reporting incidents. It also talks about gaps in knowledge and how we can combat this.
  3. Course for Teachers on teaching Black History – The Black Curriculum have provided a free course for teachers on the platform Future Learn. The course Teaching Black British History: A Teacher Training Guide, covers pedagogy in the classroom to the history of ethnocratic and Eurocentric narratives. It is a three week course which will equip you with tools to teach and embed black history into the school curriculum.
  4. Black History Curriculum Hackney – Councilor Antoinette Bramble, Deputy Mayor and Cabinet Member for Children’s Services and Education have announced a new black history curriculum developed by teachers and council staff. They are providing 9 teaching packs with 6-week lesson plans, free to all schools in Hackney and welcome other boroughs to use them in their own classrooms,
  5. Toolkit on Inclusivity for Schools – Mentally Healthy Schools have created a toolkit for and have included several resources focusing on inclusivity and celebrating differences with a focus on mental health. This provides many resources for diverse groups of children such as lesson plans (spanning all year groups), assembly ideas, 20 activities for world mental health day, resources for children who identify as LGBT+, resources for BAME communities, young carers and more.
  6. Anti Racism Resources for Primary and Secondary Schools – School Wellbeing (The Health and Wellbeing Service, Children & Families, Leeds City Council) support schools and educational settings advisory support and professional development. This page includes resources for various year groups in schools in relation to PSHE, ‘Being the same but different’, ‘being black and being me’ and other external resources.

15. Advice and Resources for Staff in Educational Settings

  1. Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man – In this series of episodes, Emmanuel Acho sits down to have an “uncomfortable conversation” with Chelsea Handler (American Talk show host) and other celebrities to educate the public on racism, social injustice, the BLM movement and why people are protesting, white privilege and more.
  2. Vulnerable Children and Discrimination – This article by Mentally Healthy Schools provides information on what discrimination is, the differences between direct and indirect discrimination, the risks this has to young people’s mental health and what schools and further education settings can do to tackle this. There are also further pages on LGBT+ discrimination and racial and religious discrimination.
  3. Racism and Bullying in Schools and How to Tackle This – The organisation Respect Me, is an anti-bullying service which aims to get adults to effectively change, and challenge bullying and stigma at individual, school, community, family, and societal level. This resource is about addressing inclusion effectively and challenging racism in schools. It includes information on the impact of racist bullying, early intervention, and prevention, recognising racist bullying and how to respond to it, and contacts and resources.
  4. 6 Ways to Build a Culture of Empathy – Infographic from ‘4 O’Clock Faculty’ who support educators that would like to improve learning for themselves and their students. This poster details 6 ways in which you can build a culture of empathy by asking questions, getting to know everyone, understanding other people’s perspectives, talking about feelings and more.
  5. Talking to Young People About Race – Advice from the British Red Cross about how to talk to children and young people about race and how to develop their understanding and awareness.
  6. Challenging Racism in British Schools – This is an article on how to challenge racism in British schools. The number of children experiencing racism has risen in schools, and how introducing anti-racism programmes into schools could begin the conversation that needs to be had .
  7. Vulnerable Children and Discrimination – Mentally Healthy Schools explain what discrimination is and how it can effect children’s mental health, their self-esteem, and their educational performance. It discusses the risks to mental health and what schools and other educational settings can do to support them.
  8. Lived Experiences of Ethnic Minority Staff in the NHS – The King’s Fund is an independent charitable organisation working to improve health and care in England. In this article Shilpa Ross talks about research undertaken, asking people from an ethnic minority background who work in the NHS to share their lived experiences. This delves into NHS staff who have experienced ‘othering’,
  9. MIND Video on Supporting Young People with BLM – In this video Natalie Hardie, a wholisitic practitioner, explains how you can support young people affected by the BLM movement.
  10. Talking Racism and Mental Health in Schools Podcast Series – Anna Freud have created a series of five podcast episodes featuring mental health, anti-racism and education experts. They discuss how racism can impact young people’s mental health and self-esteem, what does it mean to be an anti-racist school, and what are some practical steps schools can take to become anti-racist?

16. Books for Babies and Toddlers

  1. Anti-racist baby – Ibram Kendi – This is a fantastic book for young children and promotes nine steps for discussing racism.
  2. Playtime with Ted – Sophy Henn – Playtime with Ted is a book for young children that promotes imagination. Ted’s imagination goes wild – children can lift the flaps to find out what he does next.
  3. Firefighter – Ando Twin – This is a children’s book about a firefighter and what he faces in his job. Great book for diversity and representation.
  4. Hello Mr Whale – Sam Boughton – In this flap book, children learn about various friendly sea animals. It is brightly coloured so it will keep children engaged.
  5. Baby’s first words – Christianne Engle – This is a first-words book for children and it features labels for objects, actions and sound effects, as well as a fun seek-and-find element.
  6. Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes – Mem Fox and Helen Oxenbury – Great for young children – it is about how all some babies might look different from one another but are all the same (all have 10 fingers and 10 toes) its to teach children from a young age how to view images. Theme = diversity.
  7. My monster and me – Nadia Hussain – This book is about children feeling confident to express what they are feeling. It explains why feelings matter and why we must speak up.
  8. A kid’s book about racism – Jelani Memory – This book talks about what racism is and why it happens.
  9. Hello goodbye dog – Maria Gianferrari – This is about Zara and her dog, who always escapes from her house but finds his way back to her. Great for diverse representation in children’s books.
  10. Yoga Babies – Fern Cotton – About a group of diverse children who attend a yoga class together.

17. Books for Young People

  1. The mega magic hair swap – Rochelle Humes  – This book is about two girls who want to change their natural hair and realise they are perfect the way they are.
  2. Ravi’s Roar – Tom Percival – Ravi learns how to deal with his feelings and how to make amends. Great for mental health and promotes diversity.
  3. Under the Ramadan moon – Sylvia Whitman – In this book, Ramadan is explained and why Muslims fast.
  4. I live in Tokyo – Maria Takabayashi  – Mimiko takes readers on a journey about what she does each month living in Tokyo.
  5. You matter – Christian Robinson – Bright and simple picture book for young children, from lots of perspectives about why they matter which reminds children that no matter how they feel about themselves, their circumstances or what other people feel about them, they matter!
  6. Let the children march – Monica Clark Robinson – This book is about standing up for what you believe in and making your voice heard. It is from the point of view of a young African American girl growing up in Alabama who joins a peaceful protest led by Martin Luther King.
  7. Let’s talk about race – Julius Lester – This book discusses how the way race may impact how we view ourselves and how we view one another. It encourages you to look for similarities rather than differences.
  8. Look up – Nathan Bryon – Picture book about Rocket who loves space and inspires her family and neighbours to look up from their phones and watch something amazing! Great representation.
  9. Billy and the dragon – Nadia Shireen – This book is about Billy and her sidekick FatCat and the adventure they have during a fancy-dress party. Great representation and illustrations.
  10. Papa daddy and Riely – Seamus Kirst – This book enforces the message that there are many different types of families. In this case – Riely has two dads and must respond to some questions from her classmates. Great for LGBT+ representation.
  11. Brave Ballerina – Janet Collins – This is about a young girl who wants to be a ballerina in the 1930s – 40s when racial segregation existed. This story shows how Janet learned to be a ballerina and followed her dreams regardless of how difficult it was and shows her bravery.

18. Books

  1. Malcom Little – Ilyasah Shabazz – This picture book explains to young people who Malcolm X was and why he grew up to be one of America’s most influential people.
  2. Why I’m no longer talking to White People About Race -Renni eddo lodge – In this book, Journalist Renni Eddo-Lodge talks about what it is like to be a person of colour in Britain today and explores black history, white feminism, and the links between class and race.
  3. White Fragility – Robin Diangelo – This book is about what white fragility means and how it serves to uphold the system of white supremacy. It educated white people on how they can take responsibility and make a change.
  4. I Am Not Your Baby Mother – Candice Braithwaite –This book is about what it is like to be a black mother. The author talks about problems she faced such as white privilege, unconscious bias and microaggressions.
  5. Girl, Woman, Other – Bernadine Evaristo – This book follows the lives of 12 different characters who are black and British and the stories they tell spanning years.
  6. Me and White Supremacy – Layla Saad – This book teaches readers how to educate themselves on the privilege they have so they can strip unconsciously harming people of colour .
  7. Think Like a White Man – Nels Abbey – This is a satirical book with an important message. It is about the nature of discrimination especially in the workplace and how to deal with it. It is an insight into race in general and more specifically the black experience.
  8. Black British – A Forgotten History – David Olusoga – This book discusses the relationship between the British Isles and the African people. There is also a documentary consisting of 4 episodes that can be watched on BBC iPlayer.
  9. Americanah – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie – This book is about Ifemelu and her partner Obinze who grow up in Lagos under a military dictatorship. This book explores issues of race and dislocation and military conflict .
  10. It’s Not About the Burqa – Mariam Khan – This book consists of 17 Muslim women talking about the hijab and faith, feminism, sex, racism, love and divorce and more. These essays give people a real insight into the thoughts of Muslim women, not just what is portrayed in the media .
  11. Queenie – Candice Carty Williams – This is an inclusive novel about a 25-year-old Jamaican British woman living in London. This explores themes such as race, gender and culture and various relationships in her life.
  12. Natives – Race and Class in the Ruins of Empire – Akala – Author Akala covers topics such as politics, police, race, and class.
  13. Brit-ish – Afuah Hursh  – This book is about what it means to be ‘British’ and why BME communities still get asked questions like ‘where are you from? It discusses Britain’s past and explores how this came to be.
  14. The Souls of Black folk – W.e.b du bois – This book consists of essays (first published in 1903) on race and Du Bios talks about his own experience as an African American in American society .
  15. The Karma of Brown folk – Vijay Prashad – In this book Author Vijay asks south Asians what it feels like to be a ‘solution’? This is about south Asian people becoming the model minority and how America have perpetuated these stereotypes.
  16. Born a Crime – Trevor Noah – In this memoir, comedian Trevor Noah, tells people his story on his childhood about how he was born in apartheid south Africa and his journey to his current life in America and the relationship he has with his mother.